© 2019 Copyright by P. K. H. Groth, Denver, Colorado, USA All rights reserved - See contact page for for permission to republish article excerpts.

Become

Acclimated

Before

the

Hunt:

What

are

the

best

thing

you

can

do

before

going

on

a

Colorado

high-altitude

mountain

hunt?

Get

your

body

physically

in

shape

well

before

the

hunting

season.

Then

come

a

few

days

early

to

get

used

to

the

high

altitude

and

less

oxygen.

Ask

your

outfitter

or

guide

to

recommend

places

to

stay.

Nearly

all

the

2012

second

season

clients

at

Trappers

Lake

Lodge

and

cabins

bagged

an

elk.

I

have

to

wonder

if

many

of

them

had

arrived

a

few

days

early

to

relax,

acclimate

and

soak

in

the

magnificent

scenery.

You

will

be

more

successful

when

rested

and

adjusted.

www.Trappperslake.com,

email

info@trapperslake.com)

Busted Hands: Jim rode over with a personal problem his hands. They were a wreck of honeycombed fissures, some bleeding. He had brought some simple hand lotion, but that was no match for the rough camp work, working in snow and the cold. His thumbs in particular were in trouble. Deep cracks formed where the nails met the fingertip flesh. (This is a common cold weather condition, especially for older people who have aging skin.) Two horsemen also came by. They got their elk and were taking a long trip to town for a shower and supplies. Like true sportsmen, they spent an hour scouring for thick, fragrance-free Eucerin hand cream I asked them to buy for Jim. They would not take payment, saying that they too had learned from the incident! In two days Jim’s hands were recovering. The photo shows some small tubes of essentials I recommend for remote cold weather hunting. The tiny tubes of super glue are to fill in the cuticle on the sides of thumbs, preferably before they desiccate and crack. Wiping your butt with snow, sitting long periods, or unfamiliar camp water and foods can irritate your posterior, for which the anti-itch triple ointment is a savior. Use chemically non-basic castile-based biosoap for hand AND DISH WASHING. I recommend Dr. Bronner’s “super mild 18-in-one baby castile, FRAGRANCE-FREE” soap. This soap is potassium based and dries skin less than sodium and lye based soaps. (Note the small bottle I’ve filled for convenience, and to carry in my day pack to clean up after a kill. The orange duct tape allows you to find it in the grass and snow.) Simple eye drops can ease eyes strained by squinting on bright days. The drops keep eyes moist at night and induce deeper sleep. Aquaphor is an unfragranced moisturizer ointment that allows lips to rejuvenate at night better than lip balm. Do not use camphor or scented lip balm; you cannot smell elk if your olfactory nerves are numbed or overwhelmed with chemicals or fragrances. The disposable shower cap keeps your hat and head dry if a wet snow occurs, or warm if a stiff wind blows though a knitted cap . Use Preconditioned Camp Gloves: . Bring a second pair of gloves to use only in camp. Wear them when doing camp chores, especially when setting up tents. Dirt and dust can quickly dry skin, especially if you are not a tradesman with work hardened thick skin. Buy reasonable quality leather gloves. Some inexpensive gloves have rough, coarse inner leather which leaches moisture from skin, or a cotton liner that stays wet long and the dampness will soften and leach natural oils from your hands. Both exacerbate hand chapping. Use some nonfragrant hand lotion on finger tips and palms prior to using new gloves to reduce the leather drying effects on hand skin. Don’t Wash Pots, Pans and Dishes: We initially used a Svea spirit stove set and sometimes got lazy after dinner. The pots got only sloshed out, put in the cold and reused the next day. That ended when acidic spaghetti sauce etched pin holes through the expensive pure aluminum pots. With insight we improvised to make dish washing obsolete.Thin disposable aluminum pie plates and cake pans proved to be a weary hunter’s godsend. They weigh almost nothing, nestle together for transport, can be used for cooking or as a serving plate. One plate can be used as a lid. Now only one pot is needed to make hot coffee and tea water. Eat right from the pie plate.Hold a wool cap under the plate to keep food warm longer. Warm the plates on the stove after dinner to dry them, then stack them for transport out (horrors do not leave never-decay aluminum wonders in the backcountry). We pick up stacks of these plates at spring garage sales for pennies to use when hunting, in our antelope hunting cabin, and in our rambling sheep camp wagon.Use paper hot cups for soup, coffee and instant oatmeal breakfasts. Leave them separated to dry under the tent fly. Burn them. Days End Wash Up: Bring a flexible rectangular polypropylene wash tub with a snap-on cover that will fit in your backpack. Do not use polystyrene, because it will crack in the cold. Pack your delicate things in the tub. The tub will provide a quick, refreshing face wash in the evening. Getting rid of the sweat salt greatly increases the likelihood of a good night's sleep . Garbage Bag Water Heater: Keeping water unfrozen is a problem. It is impossible to get frozen water out of jerry cans and bottles. Bring a couple of black 33 gallon garbage bags. Place water containers in one bag in a place where noon to afternoon sun will shine on it. Crumple the second bag and place inside the first bag on the eastern side of the water containers to act as an afternoon heat loss insulator. Lighty tie off the bag top. This solar heating will prevent or reduce freezing of the water.​ Tent Doormats: An extra polyesther towel inside the tent door is a good way to keep the tent dry and clean of mud. Place boots on it to catch dripping water. Gather pine cones to place outside the tent door. These will prevent a quagmire from forming at the heavily used tent entry. Do not use pine branches; it is illegal in National Forests. A Drag and Comfort Bag: A coated nylon bag large enough to hold a bull hindquarter can be used to drag quarters out of a field, or even along the trail home. Mine has been used by volunteer horsemen t o drag game to the trail head for me. We've also tied the bag in the center so volunteer horse people can drape the bag over the saddle horn.Turn the bag inside out for snow travel; the coating eases sliding and prevents icing up. It makes a great garbage transport container at the end of the hunt. Carry the bag in your day pack. The bag can be used for creature comfort. Sit on it to prevent your butt from getting wet. Place it over your legs for warmth, or to deflect drops from dripping branches. Put your booted legs into it as a chill reducer when you sit, especially when the wind kicks up at dawn or dusk. (I make our bags, but include a photo of a Post Office surplus mail bag purchased at a garage sale for a dollar.)​ A drag bag can also be used to hang your hunting clothin g outside at night so the cooking and tent interior fumes will not saturate them. Sprawling on it at lunch time prevents your clothing from getting full of stickers, pine needles and grass stubs. Leave your boots in the bag outside the tent to avoid snow from blowing into them, and the snow-covered boots from melting in the tent. Get caught in a rain, and you can keep your pack and gun dry with the bag. If bears become a problem, the bag can be hoisted up on a tree branch and keep food dry. Lay butchering instruments on the bag beside the kill to avoid loosing them in the grass or snow. A coated, scent-free bag can may be accepted by a horseman volunteers to take your garbage out to your vehicle; it can be tied at the end and in the middle so it can be draped over a saddle horn. Horsemen with pack animals are more likely to offer to take out a heavy hind quarter if it is in a sealed bag that will not gore-soil their panniers. Trade the bag with another hunter who is less prepared for something you need. Lastly, leaving a remote camp in a hurry in bad weather usually involves finding a lot of miscellaneous small items at the last moment. Dump them in the bag and they will not get lost. I also use my drag bag as an easily erected blind. Shoe strings sewn to the sides permit me to hang it from a roppe or log. Place a long pole or pine cones in it to prevent breezes from m oving the blind.
Elk Camp Tips to Make Remote Elk Camps Easier, Safer and More Productive

Become

Acclimated

Before

the

Hunt:

What

are

the

best

thing

you

can

do

before

going

on

a

Colorado

high-altitude

mountain

hunt?

Get

your

body

physically

in

shape

well

before

the

hunting

season.

Then

come

a

few

days

early

to

get

used

to

the

high

altitude

and

less

oxygen.

Ask

your

outfitter

or

guide

to

recommend

places

to

stay.

Nearly

all

the

2012

second

season

clients

at

Trappers

Lake

Lodge

and

cabins

bagged

an

elk.

I

have

to

wonder

if

many

of

them

had

arrived

a

few

days

early

to

relax,

acclimate

and

soak

in

the

magnificent

scenery.

You

will

be

more

successful

when

rested

and

adjusted.

www.Trappperslake.com,

email

info@trapperslake.com)

Busted Hands: Jim rode over with a personal problem his hands. They were a wreck of honeycombed fissures, some bleeding. He had brought some simple hand lotion, but that was no match for the rough camp work, working in snow and the cold. His thumbs in particular were in trouble. Deep cracks formed where the nails met the fingertip flesh. (This is a common cold weather condition, especially for older people who have aging skin.) Two horsemen also came by. They got their elk and were taking a long trip to town for a shower and supplies. Like true sportsmen, they spent an hour scouring for thick, fragrance-free Eucerin hand cream I asked them to buy for Jim. They would not take payment, saying that they too had learned from the incident! In two days Jim’s hands were recovering. The photo shows some small tubes of essentials I recommend for remote cold weather hunting. The tiny tubes of super glue are to fill in the cuticle on the sides of thumbs, preferably before they desiccate and crack. Wiping your butt with snow, sitting long periods, or unfamiliar camp water and foods can irritate your posterior, for which the anti-itch triple ointment is a savior. Use chemically non-basic castile-based biosoap for hand AND DISH WASHING. I recommend Dr. Bronner’s “super mild 18-in-one baby castile, FRAGRANCE-FREE” soap. This soap is potassium based and dries skin less than sodium and lye based soaps. (Note the small bottle I’ve filled for convenience, and to carry in my day pack to clean up after a kill. The orange duct tape allows you to find it in the grass and snow.) Simple eye drops can ease eyes strained by squinting on bright days. The drops keep eyes moist at night and induce deeper sleep. Aquaphor is an unfragranced moisturizer ointment that allows lips to rejuvenate at night better than lip balm. Do not use camphor or scented lip balm; you cannot smell elk if your olfactory nerves are numbed or overwhelmed with chemicals or fragrances. The disposable shower cap keeps your hat and head dry if a wet snow occurs, or warm if a stiff wind blows though a knitted cap . Use Preconditioned Camp Gloves: . Bring a second pair of gloves to use only in camp. Wear them when doing camp chores, especially when setting up tents. Dirt and dust can quickly dry skin, especially if you are not a tradesman with work hardened thick skin. Buy reasonable quality leather gloves. Some inexpensive gloves have rough, coarse inner leather which leaches moisture from skin, or a cotton liner that stays wet long and the dampness will soften and leach natural oils from your hands. Both exacerbate hand chapping. Use some nonfragrant hand lotion on finger tips and palms prior to using new gloves to reduce the leather drying effects on hand skin. Don’t Wash Pots, Pans and Dishes: We initially used a Svea spirit stove set and sometimes got lazy after dinner. The pots got only sloshed out, put in the cold and reused the next day. That ended when acidic spaghetti sauce etched pin holes through the expensive pure aluminum pots. With insight we improvised to make dish washing obsolete.Thin disposable aluminum pie plates and cake pans proved to be a weary hunter’s godsend. They weigh almost nothing, nestle together for transport, can be used for cooking or as a serving plate. One plate can be used as a lid. Now only one pot is needed to make hot coffee and tea water. Eat right from the pie plate.Hold a wool cap under the plate to keep food warm longer. Warm the plates on the stove after dinner to dry them, then stack them for transport out (horrors do not leave never-decay aluminum wonders in the backcountry). We pick up stacks of these plates at spring garage sales for pennies to use when hunting, in our antelope hunting cabin, and in our rambling sheep camp wagon.Use paper hot cups for soup, coffee and instant oatmeal breakfasts. Leave them separated to dry under the tent fly. Burn them. Days End Wash Up: Bring a flexible rectangular polypropylene wash tub with a snap-on cover that will fit in your backpack. Do not use polystyrene, because it will crack in the cold. Pack your delicate things in the tub. The tub will provide a quick, refreshing face wash in the evening. Getting rid of the sweat salt greatly increases the likelihood of a good night's sleep . Garbage Bag Water Heater: Keeping water unfrozen is a problem. It is impossible to get frozen water out of jerry cans and bottles. Bring a couple of black 33 gallon garbage bags. Place water containers in one bag in a place where noon to afternoon sun will shine on it. Crumple the second bag and place inside the first bag on the eastern side of the water containers to act as an afternoon heat loss insulator. Lighty tie off the bag top. This solar heating will prevent or reduce freezing of the water.​ Tent Doormats: An extra polyesther towel inside the tent door is a good way to keep the tent dry and clean of mud. Place boots on it to catch dripping water. Gather pine cones to place outside the tent door. These will prevent a quagmire from forming at the heavily used tent entry. Do not use pine branches; it is illegal in National Forests. A Drag and Comfort Bag: A coated nylon bag large enough to hold a bull hindquarter can be used to drag quarters out of a field, or even along the trail home. Mine has been used by volunteer horsemen to drag game to the trail head for me. We've also tied the bag in the center so volunteer horse people can drape the bag over the saddle horn.Turn the bag inside out for snow travel; the coating eases sliding and prevents icing up. It makes a great garbage transport container at the end of the hunt. Carry the bag in your day pack. The bag can be used for creature comfort. Sit on it to prevent your butt from getting wet. Place it over your legs for warmth, or to deflect drops from dripping branches. Put your booted legs into it as a chill reducer when you sit, especially when the wind kicks up at dawn or dusk. (I make our bags, but include a photo of a Post Office surplus mail bag purchased at a garage sale for a dollar.)​ A drag bag can also be used to hang your hunting clothin g outside at night so the cooking and tent interior fumes will not saturate them. Sprawling on it at lunch time prevents your clothing from getting full of stickers, pine needles and grass stubs. Leave your boots in the bag outside the tent to avoid snow from blowing into them, and the snow-covered boots from melting in the tent. Get caught in a rain, and you can keep your pack and gun dry with the bag. If bears become a problem, the bag can be hoisted up on a tree branch and keep food dry. Lay butchering instruments on the bag beside the kill to avoid loosing them in the grass or snow. A coated, scent- free bag can may be accepted by a horseman volunteers to take your garbage out to your vehicle; it can be tied at the end and in the middle so it can be draped over a saddle horn. Horsemen with pack animals are more likely to offer to take out a heavy hind quarter if it is in a sealed bag that will not gore-soil their panniers. Trade the bag with another hunter who is less prepared for something you need. Lastly, leaving a remote camp in a hurry in bad weather usually involves finding a lot of miscellaneous small items at the last moment. Dump them in the bag and they will not get lost. I also use my drag bag as an easily erected blind. Shoe strings sewn to the sides permit me to hang it from a roppe or log. Place a long pole or pine cones in it to prevent breezes from m oving the blind.
Elk Camp Tips to Make Remote Elk Camps Easier, Safer and More Productive
© 2016 -2017 Copyright by P. K. H. Groth, Denver, Colorado, USA All rights reserved - See contact page for for permission to republish article excerpts.