© 2019 Copyright by P. K. H. Groth, Denver, Colorado, USA All rights reserved - See contact page for for permission to republish article excerpts.
Recommended Reading
T erry Grosz is a retired California and U.S Fish and Wildlife Service Game Warden. His riveting books expose the 32 years spent foiling game crooks, political ignoring of laws and the scrapes he had enforcing game regulations meant to manage wildlife for legitimate hunters and naturalists. His escapades in his six foot-four, 300 pound frame are presented in clear, easy reading with humoresque interludes of what he did to maximize penalties to stop the blood-lust and economic destruction of wildlife. He covers the ploys from simple single- handed arrests to “blackmailing” unfaithful-to-wives game thieves. These books are a must reading - especially if you want to die laughing. Note: I strongly suggest buying these books and passing them around to share with your hunting buddies. BE SURE TO LABEL THEM “RETURN TO ----------------” OR YOU MAY NOT GET THEM BACK - THEY ARE THAT GOOD! Go to this movie trailer to get an taste of Grosz’s book “Wildlife Wars”. (I suggest your start the book series with this one.) https://vimeo.com/11315192 (CLICK HERE for a fifteen minute trailer of the two hour Animal Planet movie “Wildlife Wars”) Mr. Grosz’ books are available from Barns and Noble and at Amazon.com Wildlife Wars For the Love of Wildlife Wildlife on the Edge A Sword for Mother Nature No Safe Refuge The Thin Green Line Defending Our Wildlife Heritage Berndt Heinrich is an entomologist, ornithologist and ultramarathoner - besides being a critical narrator of his field studies of all nature. Mr Heinrich is an expert woodsman with a life-long, uncanny ability to observe nature and deduce what it is able to tell us. The emerging natural science exposed will expand your afield universe. Between the lines are many use full tips for the hunter. Reading these books will help you develop the “Proximity Feeling” state of awareness of what is really happening in the wild. (See my book for this hunting sensory go al and why you need it.) Bernd Heinrichs books are availab le at book stores and on A mazon.com Life Everlasting ** Winter World*** Mind of the Raven*** Summer world One Man’s Owl The Trees in the Forest Homing Instinct What Should a Clever Moose Eat? Bumblebee Economics Ravens in Winter A Year in the Maine Woods** Why We Run; A Natural History One Wild Bird at a Time The “Nature Fix” (newly released February 2017) is Florence Williams’ collection of emerging science of why people benefit psychologically, emotionally and physically from being in the out doors. She is and astute journalist with the National Geographic, New York Times and contributing editor to Outside Magazine. She won the 2012 Los Angeles Times Book Prize in Science and Technology. Her first book “Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History History” was the New York Times Notable Book of the Year. In this must read book, Ms. Williams catalogs the REASONS why humans benefits from being outside with nature. They range from simple pleasures of observations to cutting -e edge research of forest healing for Post Tramatic Stress Disordered veterans, and to treating Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder children. Richard Louv’s (2005) “Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature- 0Deficit Disorder” must have inspired Florence Williams’ research. Mr. Louv describes how technology, social urban “properness”, city planners and harried parents unwittingly conspire to keep children from learning from nature. Kids’ lives are so structured that they can not interact, learn and gain confidence from doing what they instinctively want to do. No tree forts (might get hurt), no hole digging (what a mess) , no wandering the fields (pervert fear), no ball tossing on a front lawn (home owner associations) and no foot ball scrimmage (apartments have no lawns). Children grow up being sheltered, catered to without naturally learned confidence, and in need of constant artificial stimulation (think zombie- like cell phone staring). I strongly urge all parents AND GRANDPARENTS (even concerned uncle and aunts) to immediately read this book. Learning from nature should begin in the early tod dler years. Diane Ackerman’s A Natural History of the Senses” was published in 1990, but it still is pertinent to naturalists, including sportsmen. I will leave you with the Boston Globe’s review: ”A wonderful idea for a narrative journey, one that touches upon biology and anthropology, art and human consciousness …. a heady,sometimes utterly engaging dive into the world around us - from the hormonal effects of the smell of musk to the biological necessity of touch… Ackerman’s poetic vision allows her to find mystery and meaning in the most personal and idiosyneratic p laces.” “The Genius Of Birds” (2016) is Jennifer Ackerman’s revelation of how birds can be extremely intelligent, cunning, deceptive and creative. This is a penetrating journey into a world we normally pay slight attention. I stress that winged observers can reveal forest information to a hunter like a carrier pigeon; we just have to learn interpretations of their call, actions and adaptations to the forest. The moon can be considered a delight or bane of a hunt. Elsewhere in this website and book I stress that the orb affects a large following of animal to bugs, and even the hunter. Earnest Naylor’s 2017 book reviews the emerging behavioral sciences linked to the lunar cycles. Read it for pleasure, and contemplations of how the moon could be used in you favor for all outdoor activities. Edward Abby’s classic “Desert Solitare” (1968) ranks right up there with “Walden” and Muir’s writings. Get a pocket book copy and stuff it in your hunting fanny pack for good luck. Reading it while on a stand might bring you the good hunting luck of sitting still. Let your mind wander instead of our feet. This type of reading still allows a hunter to subconsciously alert to changes in the forest - maybe your prey. English-born Ernest Thompson Seton (1860-1946) spent his boyhood in the Canadian backwoods. He became a government naturalist, authored forty-two books and was a widely traveled lecturer. Time Magazine characterized Seton as “a man who, in the age of sweeping mechanization, had loved the natural earth, its seasons and creatures, with the rare intensity and unusual power to communicate his vision to others”. Snap up Seton’s early works for clear, easy reading if you see them; some first editions are valuable collector gems. The book “Wild Animals I have Known” (1898) was republished by Penguin Books in paperback format in 1987 (introduction by Noel Perrin). I suggest this is a good “naturalist starter book” for serious reader young children.
© 2016 -2017 Copyright by P. K. H. Groth, Denver, Colorado, USA All rights reserved - See contact page for for permission to republish article excerpts.
Recommended Reading
T erry Grosz is a retired California and U.S Fish and Wildlife Service Game Warden. His riveting books expose the 32 years spent foiling game crooks, political ignoring of laws and the scrapes he had enforcing game regulations meant to manage wildlife for legitimate hunters and naturalists. His escapades in his six foot-four, 300 pound frame are presented in clear, easy reading with humoresque interludes of what he did to maximize penalties to stop the blood-lust and economic destruction of wildlife. He covers the ploys from simple single-handed arrests to “blackmailing” unfaithful-to-wives game thieves. These books are a must reading - especially if you want to die laughing. Note: I strongly suggest buying these books and passing them around to share with your hunting buddies. BE SURE TO LABEL THEM “RETURN TO ----------------” OR YOU MAY NOT GET THEM BACK - THEY ARE THAT GOOD! Go to this movie trailer to get an taste of Grosz’s book “Wildlife Wars”. (I suggest your start the book series with this one.) (CLICK HERE for a fifteen minute trailer of the two hour Animal Planet movie “Wildlife Wars”) Mr. Grosz’ books are available from Barns and Noble and at Amazon.com Wildlife Wars For the Love of Wildlife Wildlife on the Edge A Sword for Mother Nature No Safe Refuge The Thin Green Line Defending Our Wildlife Heritage Berndt Heinrich is an entomologist, ornithologist and ultramarathoner - besides being a critical narrator of his field studies of all nature. Mr Heinrich is an expert woodsman with a life-long, uncanny ability to observe nature and deduce what it is able to tell us. The emerging natural science exposed will expand your afield universe. Between the lines are many use full tips for the hunter. Reading these books will help you develop the “Proximity Feeling” state of awareness of what is really happening in the wild. (See my book for this hunting sensory go al and why you need it.) Bernd Heinrichs books are availab le at book stores and on A mazon.com Life Everlasting ** Winter World*** Mind of the Raven*** Summer world One Man’s Owl The Trees in the Forest Homing Instinct What Should a Clever Moose Eat? Bumblebee Economics Ravens in Winter A Year in the Maine Woods** Why We Run; A Natural History One Wild Bird at a Time The “Nature Fix” (newly released February 2017) is Florence Williams’ collection of emerging science of why people benefit psychologically, emotionally and physically from being in the out doors. She is and astute journalist with the National Geographic, New York Times and contributing editor to Outside Magazine. She won the 2012 Los Angeles Times Book Prize in Science and Technology. Her first book “Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History History” was the New York Times Notable Book of the Year. In this must read book, Ms. Williams catalogs the REASONS why humans benefits from being outside with nature. They range from simple pleasures of observations to cutting -e edge research of forest healing for Post Tramatic Stress Disordered veterans, and to treating Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder children. Richard Louv’s (2005) “Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature- 0Deficit Disorder” must have inspired Florence Williams’ research. Mr. Louv describes how technology, social urban “properness”, city planners and harried parents unwittingly conspire to keep children from learning from nature. Kids’ lives are so structured that they can not interact, learn and gain confidence from doing what they instinctively want to do. No tree forts (might get hurt), no hole digging (what a mess) , no wandering the fields (pervert fear), no ball tossing on a front lawn (home owner associations) and no foot ball scrimmage (apartments have no lawns). Children grow up being sheltered, catered to without naturally learned confidence, and in need of constant artificial stimulation (think zombie-like cell phone staring). I strongly urge all parents AND GRANDPARENTS (even concerned uncle and aunts) to immediately read this book. Learning from nature should begin in the early tod dler years. Diane Ackerman’s A Natural History of the Senses” was published in 1990, but it still is pertinent to naturalists, including sportsmen. I will leave you with the Boston Globe’s review: ”A wonderful idea for a narrative journey, one that touches upon biology and anthropology, art and human consciousness …. a heady,sometimes utterly engaging dive into the world around us - from the hormonal effects of the smell of musk to the biological necessity of touch… Ackerman’s poetic vision allows her to find mystery and meaning in the most personal and idiosyneratic p laces.” “The Genius Of Birds” (2016) is Jennifer Ackerman’s revelation of how birds can be extremely intelligent, cunning, deceptive and creative. This is a penetrating journey into a world we normally pay slight attention. I stress that winged observers can reveal forest information to a hunter like a carrier pigeon; we just have to learn interpretations of their call, actions and adaptations to the forest. The moon can be considered a delight or bane of a hunt. Elsewhere in this website and book I stress that the orb affects a large following of animal to bugs, and even the hunter. Earnest Naylor’s 2017 book reviews the emerging behavioral sciences linked to the lunar cycles. Read it for pleasure, and contemplations of how the moon could be used in you favor for all outdoor activities. Edward Abby’s classic “Desert